Java Programming and Software Engineering Fundamentals

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Below are the top discussions from Reddit that mention this online Coursera specialization from Duke University.

Take your first step towards a career in software development with this introduction to Java—one of the most in-demand programming languages and the foundation of the Android operating system.

Html JavaScript Cascading Style Sheets (CCS) Java Programming Html5 Algorithms Problem Solving String (Computer Science) Data Structure Cryptography Hash Table Programming Principles

Accessible for free. Completion certificates are offered.

Affiliate disclosure: Please use the blue and green buttons to visit Coursera if you plan on enrolling in a course. Commissions Reddsera receives from using these links will keep this site online and ad-free. Reddsera will not receive commissions if you only use course links found in the below Reddit discussions.

Taught by
Susan H. Rodger
Professor of the Practice
and 3 more instructors

Offered by
Duke University

This specialization includes these 5 courses.

Reddit Posts and Comments

1 posts • 125 mentions • top 30 shown below

r/cscareerquestions • post
16 points • ToughAd
Advice for a CS graduate on selecting a good learning path

Hey everyone, I am a CS graduate from india. I finished the degree almost three years ago and have been unemployed since then.

I have done introductory courses in python,web development and java but i am confused on what language to focus more on to get a job.

https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming

My issue:

Got advice that java is slowly becoming outdated

So i tried learning python but there werent many entry level jobs

So my question is will doing this course help me in getting a career?

What are some projects that i can do after this course that will make me employable?

Thanks in advance

r/cscareerquestions • comment
5 points • 00rb

I'm a dev with 6 years of professional experience. My problem when I was learning programming was there were too many choices to pick from. Do you learn Java, C#, JS... etc etc? And within those languages, there's choices of frameworks as well.

So I will make some decisions for you that will make you both employable and set you up for the future: you should learn how to make web applications in Java. Don't overthink it, just do that. It will in no way limit you, and prepare you for the most jobs out there.

Here's a set of courses that you should work though. Just do these four courses and you'll be well on your way:
https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming

Coursera is pretty high quality and you don't actually have to pay for them. Paying is sort of optional.

Good luck.

r/learnprogramming • post
5 points • Trobis
Java/software development course of similar quaility

I've been meaning to study software development this summer and i found this java course online https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming

It looks great but i don't have that sort of money(still a dependent) so are there any online courses <$20 that might be similar in quality or at least close

r/learnprogramming • post
4 points • ChoteBoi
What to do after intro software engineering online courses?

So, I am considering doing the courses in this Coursera specialization, which I get for free: https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming

Considering my end goal is to possibly break into the software development space sometime in the future, such as by getting an internship at a large company, what should I follow these courses up with? Is there any other essential knowledge that typically follows this? If anyone could help me out, I would appreciate it. Thanks.

r/learnjava • post
4 points • yanader
The relative value of an additional MOOC

Hi Folks,

So I'm about half way through Duke's MOOC on Coursera (specifically the full specialization)

https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming

I've also done the first two weeks of CS50 but I put that on hold until I was finished with Duke...turns out both at once was a bad idea alongside a full-time job. (who would've thought?!).

So my intention is to finish CS50 once I'm done with the Duke course, I've watched enough of the CS50 lectures that I'm happy that it covers enough different ground that it's valuable.

What I'm wondering is, I've seen a lot of mention here of the linked MOOC in the sidebar from the University of Helsinki. I was wondering if anyone might be able to give me some insight into whether or not they think it will be worth the time after finishing up with Duke and CS50. It might be that I can run through it fairly quickly (I believe it's self paced) but then might there be a better use of my time.

Particularly interested to hear if there is anyone here that has done both.

Thanks.

r/learnprogramming • post
8 points • ChuckS117
Opinions on these Coursera courses. Java or Python.

Due to health reasons I wasn't able to attend college this semester, so I have plenty of free time.

I'm currently majoring in Finance which I like but my true love has always been computers. I didn't go for a career in computer-related stuff because both universities that I could attend don't offer a "focused" program, so I had to go with my second interest.

These 2 courses are starting next week and I'd like some input on them

One is for Python

https://www.coursera.org/specializations/python

and the other is for Java

https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming

I know the basics of Python but I've read that it's not that common in companies. Since I'm majoring in Finance, which would you think would "complement" it better?

Yes, I've read the FAQ, just want a more personalized input.

r/feedthebeast • comment
3 points • nmarshall23

The trick to learning programming is a rapid feedback loop. Making things do stuff is satisfying. Knowing that your current approach is not working let's you get back to a working state.

I would recommend taking a free class on Coursera, this Java one look good. I haven't taken that class but I have taken other classes on Coursera they are college level classes. Looks like they recommend the javascript class first. Good thing with Coursera it's free.

&#x200B;

Programming has been a real satisfying part of my life, I can't tell you how awesome it is to write something and have random people, I would never meet otherwise, tell me it's saved them time or effort.

r/coursera • post
3 points • nokeechia
Differences in prices from 2 different machines on the same network

I have just found an inconsistency between the pricing of the https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming on my machine (£191 for 6 months) and my colleagues machine (£159 for 12 months).

I have contacted the helpdesk who say my price (obviously the higher one) is the correct price.

Is there a reason why the two prices would be different? Does this mean I could have been using my colleagues account and getting sweet lower prices all this time?

r/coursera • post
2 points • uttermybiscuit
How do I enroll without paying?

So I want to join this program - https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming but I don't exactly have $300 to spend on it and I don't really need the certificate. I was under the impression coursera was free? How do I enroll without paying?

r/learnprogramming • comment
1 points • Crouchingtigerhere

Yes there is.

Java Programming and Software Engineering Fundamentals Specialization on Coursera

https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming?

r/r4r • comment
1 points • RuggedPoptart

Have you tried looking at any online Java courses? Duke University offers a Java course on Coursera that you can access for free, you have to pay extra to get a certificate. You can learn at your own pace and instructors are available to help you.

r/learnprogramming • post
1 points • babbagack
Anyone take Coursera's, Duke University, Java Programming and Software Engineering Fundamentals Specialization?

I'm at a stopping point with a paid program where I've done Ruby, OOP, data structures, regex. I saw this and actually have free enrollment, anyone take it and have feedback on it?:

https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming?utm_medium=email&utm_source=marketing&utm_campaign=ZKLZoNKeEeiWIbMCW244MA

This might be a good point to just take these courses a few months and see if that can help land me something, perhaps in Java, since well, Java seems to be easily in demand in some areas. I didn't take my other courses for the language though, but for the core concepts which I think are very solid.

r/cscareerquestions • post
1 points • TheKid9696
Software coding - where to start?

Hi all, I am an undergraduate in third year at a fairly reputable business school. I have an interest in learning coding with the long-term goal of being able to code entire pieces of software in the cloud. Does anyone have suggestions of where I should start? E.g. free online resources, recommended online courses, etc. I was looking at this certificate course offered online by Duke https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming and was wondering if anyone had any input or suggestions on it.

r/learnprogramming • post
1 points • majesticsteed
Just started following a coursera specialization in programming. I would love it if you joined me.

I will be working through this specialization on coursera: Java Specialization and would love it if you joined me. I will set up a discord server for communication and will follow along with the course work every week. If you want to join in learning programming, need an excuse to start learning, or just want someone to spot check your code then I would love to work through the course with you.

I am doing the free version and will be taking all the courses except for the capstone. You are more than welcome to pay for the certificates, I just don't have the cash for that.

Post a comment or PM me if you are interested. Course starts Monday!

r/learnprogramming • post
1 points • I_am_at_work_yeah
Coursera Java Programming, Worth Paying Money?

I am thinking of taking a programming course and was looking into taking the first Java course for beginners on coursera. https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming

Does anyone have any input on this as to whether it is worth paying the $79? I currently have no experience in programming. I have a few certifications with Network Engineering and work in the networking field. I foresee programming to become increasingly important with what I am currently doing. Any and all input is appreciated. Thanks!

r/coursera • post
3 points • Axelnite
How to access this course in the specialisation (Link provided)

Just wondering if there's a way around this for the: Java Programming: A DIY Version of Netflix and Amazon Recommendation Engines

https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming

Thanks ☺

also, added bonus if a course has finished (https://www.coursera.org/course/magicmiddleages) is it possible to access it's lectures or no?

Thanks once again, your help is dearly appreciated

r/programming • post
0 points • genesect2
Trying to learn programming for the first time, is this reliable?
r/cscareerquestions • comment
1 points • dumbkwestion

No it's not my first degree (other degree is unrelated though). If you were to enroll in the program you'd have to fulfill any general education requirements that don't transfer from your AA. I don't put that it is an online degree on my LinkedIn (like the user below said, it holds the same weight as an on-campus program). I only mention that it's an online program when asked how I'd be able to work 40 hr/week while attending classes.

I'm not sure how much experience you have with programming, but if it's minimal I'd suggest trying something like this out first: https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming. It's a pretty low risk ($54/mo) way of seeing if Comp Sci. is something you'd actually be interested in learning. I completed that and a specialization (at pace faster than recommended by Coursera) that logically followed it before starting the Auburn University program. This gave me the confidence that taking out student loans would be worth it and gave me a good foundation for the classes in the program.

r/learnprogramming • comment
1 points • ron_damon

Try to follow one of the many free courses online for beginners. The best choice for you would depend in the programming language your company uses. If you don't know where to start, try one of these free from Coursera:

Java

Python

r/learnprogramming • comment
1 points • Fyreraven

You could couple your Java and your drive to learn AI and look for a MOOC that meets both criteria like this one: https://www.udemy.com/artificial-intelligence-games-in-java/ and go on from there. Seems to me you're looking for some sort of certificate that you can take to an employer? Maybe something like this would help? https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming

r/cscareerquestions • comment
1 points • csfelthrow

Fellow GED-getter-turned-retail-employee-turned-software-engineer here. The bottom line is "it's possible, and it's tough."

The process for me was/has been:

  1. GED
  2. Community college for a semester
  3. Transfer to slightly better 4-year college for a few years not as CS major
  4. Drop out and work retail for a while to pay off loans
  5. Transfer to state university with good engineering/CS program as CS major
  6. Work my butt off for four *more* years (because I lost a ton of credits when transferring and now had to do all of the CS stuff I hadn't yet done) at state school doing research, teaching, doing interview practice, etc. on top of my course load
  7. Get a few jobs offers, take Amazon internship
  8. Job offer from FANG (closer to 30 than 20, at this point)
  9. Promotion at FANG

It was a grueling process that was fun at times, stressful almost the whole time, and downright miserable much of the time. Sure, I have coworkers who are a level (more more) above me and younger than I am. Sure, starting this job 5 years earlier would've resulted in more lifetime earnings. However, I'm in a job that I really enjoy and isn't too stressful, I make killer money, I have great job security, and maybe of more value than anything else, **all of that crazy hard work paid off.**

I know you say you're not targeting a Silicon Valley company, my point was simply that you can make happen what you put your mind to, whatever that goal might be, it just really sucks along the way and you have to stay committed and determined.

While most of the responses in this thread range from unhelpful to downright insulting, there are some good points. I'll reiterate them.

\> do you even like coding?

This is important to know. What makes you want to be a dev? There are CS jobs that don't involve writing a lot (or any) code, but they're usually the sort of jobs that you get after you've written code for a while.

\> What are you doing today to become a developer? ... Good developers always find ways to improve their skills by learning and relearning various CS areas. ... Being successful in CS is about determination and self learning.

Yeah, it's a slog. See above. You have to stay on it/work at it all the time.

\> I do suggest some formal training though. As being self taught usually leaves out... [a lot].

To answer your question in your OP, I would say yeah, if you can swing it go for a degree program. Despite what the "CS is for everyone and you learn it in your bedroom/bootcamps = $150k in your pocket in 90 days" adverts/crowd will tell you, there's a lot that you'll in a four-year degree program that you simply can't learn in 90 days (and a lot that you don't need to learn as well, of course).

\> Why don't you sit down, pick a language and try to master it?

Please don't do this. There are very few people, professional software engineers included, who are "masters" of any language. This is a direction without a realistic destination. Instead, I would recommend checking out a reputable online starter program [like this](https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming) to give it a shot and see if you enjoy it and track with the content. Just like every field, not everyone has the aptitude for it, so it's a good idea to make sure you're suited to it before you jump in head first.

Sorry for the wall of text. Hopefully my point made it across, which is simply that it's definitely possible but it requires a lot of hard work, determination, and most likely time.

r/learnprogramming • post
2 points • KyuubiReddit
Becoming good in Java when you already know programming

Hi everyone,

I am fairly knowledgeable in programming and OOP, I worked with C a long time ago, VBA, Matlab and mostly Python (by far my favourite language)

I recently found myself in need to work with Java 8/11.

I can write some basic code (enums, classes) in Java but I feel like I am far from being an expert (interfaces, hashmaps, Lombok, many things are still unclear/unknown to me) and I am far from being able to write production code or handle a Java project, unless there is a template I could copy.

After reading many threads here, I am debating doing one of the following:

As for my preferred learning style, I really like a lot of practice with minimal theory, and I'd use IntelliJ.

Any recommendation/opinion would be highly appreciated.

P.S.: I know some of you recommend the 70h Udemy course, but it's lengthy and the 1-star reviews don't paint a good picture of it.

r/learnprogramming • post
1 points • janez33
Are these Coursera courses worth the money?

Please help me out :) I am a total begginer, have some basic knowledge in python tbh.

https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming https://www.coursera.org/specializations/website-development

r/OpenUniversity • comment
1 points • Altruistic_Justice

Personally I recommend the OU absolutely. So far my classes have been to a high standard, tutors have been friendly, and the OU is flexible.

But M269? Given Cypher's very negative review, the amount of likes his comment got, and the fact that I've seen numerous other people hating on the module... I am strongly considering avoiding it.

Mister Dee, are you considering doing a full degree? Or just that single module?

The other stage 2 modules look good. There's a java programming one, web development, and more.

A degree helps a lot with employment, but I know some incredibly skilled coders with 0 qualifications.

Similarly I know some guys with computing degrees who probably can't code hello world without 2 hours and google.

The OU is fantastic and may be for you, but I'd also like to recommend edX & Coursera!

There are thousands of courses offered online by many different universities via edX & Coursera.

I think edX courses are free to do, but cost money for the certificate.

Coursera courses cost to do, but the certificate is included in that cost, and if you're poor like me then apply for financial aid to get it for free.

These edX & Coursera courses are not the length, complexity, or value of an OU degree. But you will learn a LOT and gain new skills by doing them, which is most important, and having the courses listed on your CV might convince employers to give you a chance.

CS50 is available online. It's a first year CS course at Harvard and you can do it online! It's free to do, and $90 for the certificate. It has fantastic reviews, and is a great introduction to CS.

https://www.edx.org/course/cs50s-introduction-computer-science-harvardx-cs50x

W3C (The organisation who control the internet or whatever), offer a Professional Certificate in front end web development which would take you to a competent level in that. Again I think it's FREE to do, just the certificates which cost money.

https://www.edx.org/professional-certificate/w3cx-front-end-web-developer

Want to learn Java? Then Duke University offer a specialisation in Java Programming.

https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming

There are thousands of courses covering all sorts of topics!

The OU actually has a similar website called OpenLearn. Check it out. It's free short courses. I think they are much more basic than the edX/Coursera ones though.

OU is fantastic, but there are other options too. Personally I'm doing OU and then doing other online courses on the side.

I wish you all the best!

r/javascript • comment
1 points • ford4321
r/UMD • comment
1 points • Yithar

Honestly you've been exposed to the material so you should be fine.

That being said, there are some courses on Coursera.
https://www.coursera.org/specializations/object-oriented-programming
https://www.coursera.org/learn/object-oriented-java
https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming

Btw, I recommend this playlist for learning about Object-Oriented Design.
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfbPmcuPNi5oBuTATzK249zI9dL7jMVXQ

r/cscareerquestions • post
1 points • Johnnygmm
Can anyone help me please? Regarding my career

Hi everyone, I am new here and not sure if this is the right place to post, but anyway I have come to a cross road in my education career and future career. I recently completed my level 7 (3 years) Civil Engineering degree and currently doing my level 8. I have completely lost all motivation and want to pursue my passion in programming.

As you can imagine, I can kinda of lost of where to start but I started to teach myself Java and was going to move on to Python or Ruby on Rails.

I need some sort of certificate or degree (course) to show a future employer I can do the work. I have found several courses I am interested in (some free, some at a cost). I want to be able to do a course which gets me career/job ready, so if I was to go into an interview, I can say I have this certificate/ degree and that will be enough to meet there requirements.

So my question is, I have a few courses I will link after this paragraph and would love if you could drop me some help regarding the courses and see what you think of them and if anyone knows any other courses I could take a look at or what path to take, link below please.

Coursea.org - Full Stack Web Development - https://www.coursera.org/specializations/full-stack

Coursea.org - Java Programming: An Introduction to software Specialization - https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming

Coursea.org - Web Design for Everybody Specialization - https://www.coursera.org/specializations/web-design

Fitzwilliam Institute - There's so many course in Java, Web, etc on this site but all the courses names are so similar and not sure what one should I do (IF that was what I was going to go towards) - http://www.fitzwilliaminstitute.ie/index.php

Sorry for the long post! But thanks everyone in advance!

Johnny.

r/learnprogramming • post
1 points • AcceptableInstance
Confused about the right learning path from a list of already bought courses

Hey everyone,

I am currently confused about what learning path would suit best for me as i am looking to be employed in a month or two (asap due to family reasons).

The companies i apply for generally come under these categories(descending order):

  1. Web Development without Java in backend
  2. Web Development with Java in backend
  3. trains you in technologies based on how well you perform in coding rounds using C/C++/Java

Disclaimer: This list is limited to what i have searched for till now.

I have a little bit more interest in learning web development with the stack offered by the colt steele program and i also want my basics in DS and AL right so i bought his course on the same using javascript.

If i had the time then i would learn java properly doing both the courses and then learn web technologies through other courses.

All i want to do is get a job in this field fast and then figure out which path to proceed.

Thats where i need your help. Can you help me decide from the following list of courses which ones to focus immediately?

I can average 6-8 hours in a day.

The Courses i have access to :

For Java:

  1. This course is an introduction to basic java programming:

https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming

  1. This course covers various data structures, algorithms and preparatory resources for interviews:

https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-object-oriented

&#x200B;

For Web Development:

  1. Web development by Colt Steele

https://www.udemy.com/the-web-developer-bootcamp/learn/v4/content

  1. Java Script algorithms and data structures by Colt Steele

https://www.udemy.com/js-algorithms-and-data-structures-masterclass/learn/v4/content

&#x200B;

Thanks in advance.

r/learnprogramming • post
1 points • oldish79
Need an advice: on choosing which language to learn and are those listed courses a good choice?

Hello people

Need you advice on staring out as a programmer.Watched this, and checking the most trending technologies today http://stackoverflow.com/research/developer-survey-2016

Don't know on witch one to focus on. After everything I'm very interesting into JAVA, C#, JAvascript, Python or PHP.

As on that Stackoverflow artcile, Javascript is very dominate one.

Now... Is it enough to learn just pure Javascript, maybe as an addon to learn NOde.js?

https://www.lynda.com/JavaScript-tutorials/JavaScript-Essential-Training/81266-2.html https://www.lynda.com/Node-js-tutorials/Node-js-Essential-Training/417077-2.html

Or for example for PHP+MYSQL Recimo kurs https://www.lynda.com/MySQL-tutorials/PHP-MySQL-Essential-Training/119003-2.html

or JAVA https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming https://www.coursera.org/specializations/android-app-development

Python https://www.coursera.org/specializations/python

or C#. https://channel9.msdn.com/Series/C-Sharp-Fundamentals-Development-for-Absolute-Beginners?sort=viewed#tab_sortBy_viewed (I know there is more things to add here MVC, WPF, ASP.NET)

I'm very interesting into something, if build some strong knowledge on it to work alone(as a freelancer), with others or find a good decent job in IT company.

I'm lost in all of this, so don't know which one to choose, and on which to focus? (I'm 37y old dude)

Thanks

r/learnprogramming • post
0 points • Johnnygmm
Anyone able to help me? Programming

Hi everyone, I am new here and not sure if this is the right place to post, but anyway I have come to a cross road in my education career and future career. I recently completed my level 7 (3 years) Civil Engineering degree and currently doing my level 8. I have completely lost all motivation and want to pursue my passion in programming.

As you can imagine, I can kinda of lost of where to start but I started to teach myself Java and was going to move on to Python or Ruby on Rails.

I need some sort of certificate or degree (course) to show a future employer I can do the work. I have found several courses I am interested in (some free, some at a cost). I want to be able to do a course which gets me career/job ready, so if I was to go into an interview, I can say I have this certificate/ degree and that will be enough to meet there requirements.

So my question is, I have a few courses I will link after this paragraph and would love if you could drop me some help regarding the courses and see what you think of them and if anyone knows any other courses I could take a look at or what path to take, link below please.

Coursea.org - Full Stack Web Development - https://www.coursera.org/specializations/full-stack

Coursea.org - Java Programming: An Introduction to software Specialization - https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming

Coursea.org - Web Design for Everybody Specialization - https://www.coursera.org/specializations/web-design

Fitzwilliam Institute - There's so many course in Java, Web, etc on this site but all the courses names are so similar and not sure what one should I do (IF that was what I was going to go towards) - http://www.fitzwilliaminstitute.ie/index.php

Sorry for the long post! But thanks everyone in advance!

Johnny.