Introduction to Scripting in Python

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Below are the top discussions from Reddit that mention this online Coursera specialization from Rice University.

This specialization is intended for beginners who would like to master essential programming skills.

Codeskulptor Data Analysis Python Programming Data Visualization (DataViz) Python Syntax And Semantics Debugging Tuple List & Label

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Taught by
Scott Rixner
Professor
and 1 more instructor

Offered by
Rice University

This specialization includes these 1 courses.

Reddit Posts and Comments

0 posts • 9 mentions • top 5 shown below

r/learnpython • comment
1 points • MavSidharth

Slightly off topic, because I haven't read the Automate the Boring Stuff book, but I've put a recommendation for you below.

https://www.coursera.org/specializations/introduction-scripting-in-python

If you want to learn basics in Python and eventually go for data analysis this a very good one. ( PS : I am doing the same course right now, and I ABSOLUTELY love it )

The specialisation is divided into 4 courses, the first one being the basics of Python and from there it is all about the different ways you're going to manage raw data using files, analyse the data and visualise it. I am on the second course right now, completing the final project ( it is about finding the difference between 2 string files ).

What I like about the course : These are the same professors that have taught some of the best Python specialisations on Coursera, and the fact that it is geared towards managing files and analysis. ( I haven't reached the analysis part yet, but found out by reading the syllabus )

I recommend you to go to the link above and check the syllabus once, if you like it then way to go!

r/Slovakia • comment
1 points • Dson1

Na Udemy

a pak Coursera

r/AskComputerScience • comment
2 points • The_Amp_Walrus

It seems that you have good motivation. I suggest that instead of following your university courses you should do some online courses that are designed for you to do at home. My favourites are:

They're definitely not the only courses available they're just ones that I did and enjoyed. If you only do one, then I think Principles of Computing is the best. Good luck!

If you're still struggling with these, try this intro to python first.

Also online courses aren't the only things you can do to get CS skills. The over the wire hacking games will teach you about computer security and the Linux command line. It might be a little rough getting started but once you find your feet I think you'll find it rewarding.

r/TooAfraidToAsk • comment
1 points • gummibear049

> I've never tried coding, but I'm afraid it wouldn't be for me since I've never been the nerdy type obsessed with this sort of stuff.

You don't need to be "nerdy" to get into coding.

If you're interested in it, go for it.

There are many resources online to help you get started.

Like CS50, which is a free, self paced, intro to comp sci offered by Harvard.

https://online-learning.harvard.edu/course/cs50-introduction-computer-science

There are also courses offered on Coursera

https://www.coursera.org/specializations/introduction-scripting-in-python

And many sub-reddits too

https://www.reddit.com/r/cscareerquestions/wiki/index

https://www.reddit.com/r/learnprogramming/wiki/index

https://www.reddit.com/r/ITCareerQuestions/wiki/index

r/learnpython • comment
2 points • rdv_chio

I see, well probably it is more of a step by step learning. I like codecademy and datacamp for the basics, and then move into the coursera/udacity for the more advanced topics. Others have mentioned Edx, I think it will be more your style regarding what is better for you.

Edit: adding stuff now that I am in front a computer

Very easy starting tutorials:

(https://www.codecademy.com/learn/learn-python) (https://www.datacamp.com/courses/intro-to-python-for-data-science) https://www.edx.org/course/introduction-computer-science-mitx-6-00-1x-11

Longer intros (multiple courses with a capstone): (https://www.coursera.org/specializations/introduction-scripting-in-python) (https://www.coursera.org/specializations/python) (I know some of these had been mentioned before, but just wanted to compile them for you)

I'd encourage you to go through all the courses and do the capstone, since it seems to me you are serious in getting a good leg into the capstone.

More personalized bootcamps: (https://www.udacity.com/course/intro-to-programming-nanodegree--nd000) (https://www.thedataincubator.com/foundations.html) (Springboard's requires you to do a couple of required courses before, the datacamp intros should suffice) (https://www.springboard.com/workshops/data-science-intensive)

Going all the way to a masters's from Udacity (https://www.udacity.com/georgia-tech)

Packt Publisher oand O'Reilly have a good suscription for reference (https://www.packtpub.com/) (https://www.safaribooksonline.com/)

Anyway, I think 5k is an amazing budget, if I were you I'd look for the more personalized learning things, but I'd also look into a good suspcription for datacamp/codecademy and safari/packt. You are the one that knows how you learn best, and as asuch, I'd explore which one works best for you. Have fun1