Object Oriented Programming in Java

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Below are the top discussions from Reddit that mention this online Coursera course from University of California San Diego.

Welcome to our course on Object Oriented Programming in Java using data visualization.

Logic Programming Java Programming Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) Sorting Algorithm

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Taught by
Mia Minnes
Assistant Teaching Professor
and 2 more instructors

Offered by
University of California San Diego

Reddit Posts and Comments

0 posts • 26 mentions • top 9 shown below

r/learnjava • post
18 points • kdthisone
There's an OOP Java course from UCSD on Coursera

https://www.coursera.org/learn/object-oriented-java
If you have a bit of a hard time understanding OOP/Inheritance/Polymorphism you should consider joining. The course assumes beginner java knowledge and it's free (optional paid certificate) .

r/Purdue • comment
9 points • captainpyotr

I kind of find it hard to believe that there aren't many resources for Java. Withdraw if you feel like you absolutely must but there are some really good resources out there. Are you not understanding stuff about object classes and such? One really good resource I studied prior to being in college was UCSD's Object Oriented Java Coursera course. Best of luck man. I also know Logan browses the sub regularly, maybe he can help you out a bit more than I can.

r/cs50 • post
22 points • idol2k
Investment banker completes CS50: new destination? + thank you staff!

Dear all,

Last week, I’ve finally completed all the problem sets! It was a bit of a struggle (although an extremely pleasant one!) since my investment banking job means I had at most 2 days to focus on CS50 (I usually work entire weekends too, logging 80-100 hours per week). Might sound trivial but I feel very pleased to have completed the course in these circumstances and without CS background.

I also wanted to thank CS50 staff! Your enthusiasm is absolutely inspiring, and I felt touched despite not being on H/Y campus. Tremendous thanks for your continuous efforts in making computer science available to all!

With my eyes set on the final project, I decided to do a few more side courses, go through a few books / tutorials before I actually start building it because much deeper fundamental knowledge will be required. I realise how terribly little I know at the moment but one area that really stands out is - JavaScript; I found it very cryptic and any resources in this area would be very welcome.

At university, I did one of the best economics degrees in the world so I am familiar with linear algebra, calculus and statistics - feel free to recommend more mathematically rigorous courses.

Personally, the most obvious candidates for me are: 1. MITx Introduction to Computer Science and Programming Using Python https://www.edx.org/course/introduction-computer-science-mitx-6-00-1x-9 2. https://www.coursera.org/learn/algorithms-part1 as recommended by David J. Malan himself 3. https://www.edx.org/course/artificial-intelligence-ai-columbiax-csmm-101x#! 4. https://internetingishard.com/html-and-css/ 5. https://www.coursera.org/learn/object-oriented-java (this is intermediate, what could should I take to learn basics first – CS50 won’t suffice, I guess?) 6. https://www.coursera.org/learn/machine-learning

Courses, books, blogs are all welcome.

Many thanks and happy coding!

r/learnjava • post
8 points • batman007619
Opinions on Coursera's Object Oriented Java Programming Specialization by UCSD?

Here's a link to the speicalization.

I'm a fresh UB electrical engineering graduate and I realized that I liked coding in my senior year, when I built a sweet Mario-like game in VHDL on an FPGA. My aim is to get a full-time job in coding, preferably ASAP. Despite being an EE grad, I don't want to code in VHDL C/C++ for many reasons, one being that I very much prefer Java to them.

I've completed the first course in the specialization (Java OOP) in two weeks and I'm loving it so far. Planning to start doing personal projects soon (maybe after the second course (data structures)?).

I want to know if it's worth going through the whole specialization in order to get a job. It'd be awesome if someone could lay out a track to get a job and how long it would take. Also, what are currently the most in demand frameworks/skills right now?(BTW, I'm also doing Andrew Ng's Machine Learning course on Coursera and the AWS Solution's Architect certfication)

r/learnprogramming • post
2 points • SmokinAce88
Free Intermediate Java Course (object-oriented)

I am looking for a good FREE online course to learn java object-oriented programming. I am not a total beginner. I stared this one from coursera https://www.coursera.org/learn/object-oriented-java/home/welcome but i have to pay 71 $ (cant afford) just to take any quizzes. Is there any other way to learn java o.o.p fast and make my own project? I have to weeks until my Msc starts and i need to know Java.

r/opensourcesociety • post
3 points • leungleoqin
Stuck on first assignment of Algorithm course

I have zero prior experience in CS/programming, and in the past few months I got through the first few courses (CS50, Mathematical Thinking, Systematic Program Design, Calculus One, Discrete Math), completing all video lectures and assignments. I also took a MOOC on Javascript in the meanwhile.

However, I got stuck on the first assignment in Princeton's Algorithm course, which requires us to write a programme on percolation in Java from scratch - like many beginners I just stared at the blank IDE not knowing where to start.

There is a course on the curriculum right after "Algorithms" on Java, but I saw in the syllabus that it is for intermediate learners. How should I bridge that gap? Is this Java beginner's course a good place to start? Or if anyone is taking the same Algorithm class, are there just some instructions I missed?

Thanks!

r/learnjava • comment
1 points • fluffyzilly

I really love Java OOP course from UC San Diego. If you have basics knowledge of Java, try it https://www.coursera.org/learn/object-oriented-java

It is one of the best to understand main Java concepts step by step

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If you just started your learning, try CodeGym course, it has lectures and practical tasks for beginners and middle level Java students. Practical tasks are with code validation and tips.

r/learnprogramming • comment
1 points • pgmmer

I started with Python from this udemy course . After that I learned object oriented programming in Java from this coursera course. Currently, I am doing data structures using this coursera course

You can just start with any python course. Then take a data structures course in python from Univ of Michigan in Coursera

Whatever language you choose, follow this order: 1) basic imperative programming 2) object oriented programming 3) data structures and algorithms

r/UMD • comment
1 points • Yithar

Honestly you've been exposed to the material so you should be fine.

That being said, there are some courses on Coursera.
https://www.coursera.org/specializations/object-oriented-programming
https://www.coursera.org/learn/object-oriented-java
https://www.coursera.org/specializations/java-programming

Btw, I recommend this playlist for learning about Object-Oriented Design.
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfbPmcuPNi5oBuTATzK249zI9dL7jMVXQ