Think Again III
How to Reason Inductively

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Below are the top discussions from Reddit that mention this online Coursera course from Duke University.

Want to solve a murder mystery? What caused your computer to fail? Who can you trust in your everyday life? In this course, you will learn how to analyze and assess five common forms of inductive arguments: generalizations from samples, applications of generalizations, inference to the best explanat...

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Taught by
Dr. Walter Sinnott-Armstrong
Professor
and 1 more instructor

Offered by
Duke University

Reddit Posts and Comments

0 posts • 1 mentions • top 1 shown below

r/AskReddit • comment
5 points • happy_waldo

I agree with you that what that guy said was stupid, but analogies are 100% arguments. They aren't always good ones (case in point above), but they are definitely arguments.

Any time a scientist does an experiment on a lab rat and extrapolates that it will work for humans, that is an argument from analogy. Any time you use an analogy to illustrate a point, that is an argument from analogy.

Edit: Man, Reddit is ridiculous. Argument from Analogy is an incredibly common and useful form of inductive reasoning. There is even a Wikipedia article about it. Here's an article from Stanford showing how it was even an argument in Aristotle's time. Here is a tutorial from the University of Hong Kong about it. Even some guy named Martin the Wizard knows about it. Here's like a class thing from Duke about it. Here is a David Angler essay on it.

C'mon people, this is all first page of Google stuff. Get it together, Reddit.