Introduction to Engineering Mechanics

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Below are the top discussions from Reddit that mention this online Coursera course from Georgia Institute of Technology.

This course is an introduction to learning and applying the principles required to solve engineering mechanics problems.

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Taught by
Dr. Wayne Whiteman, PE
Senior Academic Professional
and 15 more instructors

Offered by
Georgia Institute of Technology

Reddit Posts and Comments

1 posts • 51 mentions • top 6 shown below

r/EngineeringStudents • post
82 points • GT_Faculty_Member
Free Online Introduction to Statics Course

Hi All:

I just wanted you all to be aware that my introduction to statics course (titled "Introduction to Engineering Mechanics") is now available on Coursera all of the time (on-demand). You do not need to wait for a start date. It is self-paced and you can start today. Please see: https://www.coursera.org/learn/engineering-mechanics-statics

Please consider sharing this information with friends/family/others. The course should be useful to university students. I also have a lot of high school students who take the course and are successful. This is a free and unique way for high schoolers to see what engineering is all about before they get to college.

Thanks!

r/EngineeringStudents • comment
4 points • neverwasbeen

Hi, could somebody please explain something to me from this video: https://www.coursera.org/learn/engineering-mechanics-statics/lecture/vdOph/module-6-systems-of-particles-equilibrium

There is an assumption that the pulleys are frictionless, yet in his component analysis of static equilibrium he shows tensile forces acting on the pulleys! Shouldn't that only be possible with friction? As without friction the forces would always be acting perpendicular to the pulley with no friction to translate the force onto the pulley?

My problem specifically begins to arise here: https://i.gyazo.com/1a805b83185c8d03ce4f371e3b03d2eb.png

How can the tensile weight forces of the string be acting on the pulley if there is no friction?

r/engineering • comment
36 points • GT_Faculty_Member2

I have some free classes on www.coursera.org that you may find useful in your studies. Hopefully you will find this one helpful for Poisson's ratio and Mohr's Circle:

Mechanics of Materials I: Fundamentals of Stress and Strain and Axial Loading: https://www.coursera.org/learn/mechanics-1

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I have several other courses as well if you are interested:

Statics-Part 1: https://www.coursera.org/learn/engineering-mechanics-statics

Statics-Part 2: https://www.coursera.org/learn/engineering-mechanics-statics-2

Dynamics-Part 1 (2D): https://www.coursera.org/learn/dynamics

Dynamics - Part 2 (3D): https://www.coursera.org/learn/motion-and-kinetics

Mechanics of Material II: Thin walled Pressure Vessels and Torsion: https://www.coursera.org/learn/mechanics2

Mechanics of Materials III: Beam Bending: https://www.coursera.org/learn/beam-bending

Mechanics of Material IV: Deflections, Buckling, Combined Loading, and Failure Theories: https://www.coursera.org/learn/materials-structures

NOTE: - Yes, these courses are free! You can pay $49 for a certificate if you want, but it is in no way obligatory.

I hope you find this material useful. If so, please tell your friends about this resource.

r/AskEngineers • comment
1 points • TutorialVillain

This Coursera Course helped me a lot with statics. I also did tons of practice problems from Hibbelers book.

r/AskEngineers • comment
1 points • fyrilin

Others have talked about math and that's SUPER important. However, the standard weed-out courses (although we joke that they're all weed-out courses) are Engineering Mechanics ("solids" at my school) and Aerodynamics 1. Here's a free course on basic engineering mechanics and here is a free(ish - if you want the certificate it costs more) class for aerodynamics.

r/EngineeringStudents • comment
11 points • GT_Faculty_Member3

Please try my free courses on Coursera as a help with Dynamics.

Here are the links:

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Dynamics-Part 1 (2D): https://www.coursera.org/learn/dynamics

Dynamics - Part 2 (3D): https://www.coursera.org/learn/motion-and-kinetics

​

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If you need help with Statics or Mechanics of Materials, I also have these courses available:

​

Statics-Part 1: https://www.coursera.org/learn/engineering-mechanics-statics

Statics-Part 2: https://www.coursera.org/learn/engineering-mechanics-statics-2

​

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Mechanics of Materials I: Fundamentals of Stress and Strain and Axial Loading: https://www.coursera.org/learn/mechanics-1

Mechanics of Material II: Thin walled Pressure Vessels and Torsion: https://www.coursera.org/learn/mechanics2

Mechanics of Materials III: Beam Bending: https://www.coursera.org/learn/beam-bending

Mechanics of Material IV: Deflections, Buckling, Combined Loading, and Failure Theories: https://www.coursera.org/learn/materials-structures

​

NOTE: - Yes, these courses are free! You can pay $49 for a certificate if you want, but it is in no way obligatory.

I hope you find this material useful. If so, please tell your friends about this resource.